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AS Tabular Illustration | English, The Vulgate
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A, AS, ASH, AST

Qualities of the Ash

 

[ref][AS. ascian to seek] “from Sanscrit root ish”. I disagree, as ‘seek’ sounds like 20th Century; more likely [Gr. Askos a wineskin, bladder] -symbolism for a want that needs filling.[/ref]   ASK
[ref][AS. hæs] 3rd person singular indicative of ‘to have’ Singular because the ash is solitary.[/ref] H AS
[ref][AS. wæs] 1st and 3rd person singular, past tense indicative of ‘to be’ As in the verb ‘to have’, the irregular conjugation, using -as, expresses the singularity.[/ref] W AS
[ref]“word coined by Belgian chemist, Van Helmont (1577-1644) from Greek ‘Chaos’ ” He couldn’t very well say it was runic transliteration- or, /g/ could subconsciously be Gyfu, the ‘gracious giver’[/ref] G AS
[ref]swathed or wrapped with bands or fillets; this can be sticks, muscle fibers, even people[/ref] F ASCIA
[ref]the term now usually refers to political extremism- peoples bound like fascia, not free-thinking[/ref] F ASCIST
[ref](also frequently used in compound words) rapid movement, stability, combination of both[/ref] F AST
[ref]make, shape or form- both people and things- usually from the outside rather than inner drive.[/ref] F ASHION
[ref][AS.mæst the stem of a tree or bough] the pole(s) that support ships’ sails …and we see in some of the following words that ash power can both support and overpower or knock down[/ref] M AST
[ref]person in control or the act of taking control[/ref] M ASTER
[ref]to crush, cut, knead, grind or chew into small bits[/ref] M ASTICATE
[ref]to change to a soft or uniform mass by crushing or beating[/ref] M ASH
[ref]‘head’ or a hit on the head[/ref] B ASH
[ref][Persian and Turkish] also English ‘head’ or a smashing blow on the head[/ref] P ASH
[ref]to rush or to strike with violence /d/ is runically equivalent to Ogham Duir the oak, also the rune of Dag (day) which balances the polarities of light and darkness- the ash supporting boundaries[/ref] D ASH
[ref]a long, deep cut /g/ Gyfu, the ‘gracious giver’ of the Saxon runerow, saxe being the “separator” sword for which they were named, and the ash being a very tall and thick tree, ‘gash’ is suitable.[/ref] G ASH
[ref]mince, chop, hack or cut /h/ being Hagal, the structural beam. Ash was a tree for very precise and effective weapons and tools[/ref] H ASH
[ref]any thong, cord or like thing for whipping /l/ Lagu the rune of law and of fluidity Lashes are used as punishment and the ash has long, narrow, whip-shaped branches[/ref] L ASH
[ref]a loud, harsh noise as of two metallic objects colliding, also used more figuratively as colours clashing or disagreeing[/ref] CL ASH
[ref]a frame for holding window glass; also a long, narrow strip of fabric The grain of ash is suitable for making long, narrow strips of wood[/ref] S ASH
[ref]to cause to fall or turn; to throw The initial /c/ represents the runic KEN, a determinative making this a deliberate action with the sometime largeness of the ash.[/ref] C AST
[ref][AS. blæst ] a puff or violent gust of wind. The initial blend bl- has that ash-trait of authority or royalty, Beorc-Lagu Changeability Law and Being as in blood, bless, bloom, bliss, bleak, blear, blemish, blight, blind, blend, blown – areas of authority teetering on the brink of divinity[/ref] BL AST
[ref]half of all birds are passerine (like the sparrow) having grasping feet with the first toe elongated and directed backward for gripping a branch, a strong ash trait[/ref] P ASSERINE
[ref][ME. that can feel or suffer] sensible. The description of the living tree (above) describes the ash’s sensibilities “with nothing of debility”[/ref] P ASSIBLE
[ref]to move, change or progress from one process, place or condition to another. The /p/ is a determinative which speaks volumes. The rune Peorth is a kind of birthing process. Though it is symbolized by the Yoni (vulva), it depicts the many ways that nature unfolds when birthing. Whether passing laws, a football, a goose egg or a human child, the Ash is used as the sense element. So, the word ‘pass’ says as much about ash as ash says about ‘pass’.[/ref] P ASS
[ref].[/ref] P ASSAGE
[ref].[/ref] FL ASH
[ref]a work of earth, brick or stones that stands out from a fortified work toprotect the wall- usually consists of two flanks and two faces[/ref] B ASTION
[ref]to beat down, bat in pieces to crush; to crush, subdue, suppress forcibly; in law, to abate, annul, overthrow, void or set aside[/ref] QU ASH
[ref]break or shatter to pieces with noise and violence; to collide with crushing force[/ref] SM ASH
[ref]showy, conspicuous; brief dazzling light; sudden violent flood; to pour or sprinkle; to burn furiously; to send something swiftly.[/ref] FL ASH
[ref].[/ref] C ASTIGATE
[ref]The most common reference for ‘asp’ is as Cleopatra’s choice for suicide. It is a lethal little snake. and describes the runic potential of Peorth when used at the end of a word or sentence.[/ref]   ASP
[ref]a lock or knife in which the catch fastens automatically; to hold tightly with the arms or hands[/ref] CL ASP
[ref]A gasp has ash between the Gracious Giver and Peorth, the entrance to this world and the next, thereby demonstrating the potential seriousness of a gasp.[/ref] G ASP
[ref]A hasp has ash between Hagal and Peorth. If we know this is a hinge, we know it should be heavy-duty hardware. “A hinged metal fastening for a door.”[/ref] H ASP
[ref]By now, if I say that a rasp is a tool, you will know that it is powerful enough to transform something into non-existence or a pile of dust. “A rough file with raised points to rub roughly.”[/ref] R ASP
[ref]It is a pretty safe bet that the name wasp describes a force of Nature, no matter that it’s tiny and has a wasp waist. “A biting mouth and a nasty sting.”[/ref] W ASP
[ref]“filthy, foul, offensive, dirty” No specifics, categories or sense element. Now, that is a word that has had me stumped. (a bit of tree humour) The letter /N/ is the rune Nyd which is often pronounced as ‘need’. It often represents a need and, just as often, Nyd at the beginning of a word negates the thing, as in neither, none, not, never. ‘Nasty’ is a kind of oxymoron in that if it is ‘ash’ it cannot be foul. ‘Nasty’ has the sense of ‘not ash-like’.[/ref] N ASTY

English has two /A/s. The second /A/ or Æ is now seldom used; but, is quite present in both sense and sound. Those letters represent two different temperaments of people in tree symbolism. The words in which the ‘letter’ ash (æ,Æ) is found both demonstrate and illustrate those differences. This gives us a mental picture of the sense of the word. If that sense is lacking, the ‘definition’ is suspect.

The Ash tree is an ancient symbol and is found in Sanscrit, Semitic, Teutonic and Celtic myths, legends and languages. The symbol enters the English language from all of these language families and it enters in many ways. We become aware of the Ash symbolism by way of the sense element of the Ash in the various words. These words carry the nature of the tree in their meanings. The English language demonstrates how very aware of nature our ancestors were. They pass on their observations within our language. Since this ‘sense’ enters English as ‘ash’, representing æ, it is not coming as the Tree Ogham symbol for ash ‘Nion’ which represents /n/. It was necessary to add a symbol to the Irish version of the italic alphabet in order to represent this fundamental principle of ‘ash’. This principle is expressed as Yggdrasil, the Cosmic Axis of the three levels of the universe containing the ‘nine worlds’ of creation. This ash-trait within nature, including human nature is described partly in text, then demonstrated in the following list of representative words containing the ash sense elements.

While I can see great differences among the many trees, I don’t understand just what it is that I’m seeing so, I will paraphrase excerpts from a few books: ‘the wood is hard, smooth, even-grained and straight. When tempered with fire the ash grows even stronger. The strength and trueness of the wood makes it the choice for spears, “the only long-range weapon of the Celts of the Bronze and Iron Ages”.1 The spear was/is also a magician’s symbolic weapon and equates with the Lesser Magical Weapon of the Wand which represents the ‘will’ of the magician. Ash is also the wood of the magician’s wand.2 Anyone who works with language is working with Great Magic. If the image of spears and wands doesn’t speak to you, the ‘weavers’ beams, which hold both the long threads and the finished fabric, are also of ash.

Much more is written about the uses of wood as lumber products and by-products. However, as a living person is more informative than a dead one, living trees tell us more about them than does their ‘lumber’. Excerpts on the live Ash tree: “…pleasure in hanging branches increased …contrast of curves that spring from upper or lower sides respectively…the upper side curves downwards…then up again. Such a line…all the suggestion of a steel spring and nothing of debility. We find it in the hanging branches of an ash.”3 “Compare the Oak with an Ash…angles in the latter are less open; branches are in pairs…each pair at right angles to the next pair instead of in groups; boughs farther spaced from one another, forming simple flowing lines…boughs more inclined upwards…support pendant branches below them…other branches formed on the upper side curve downwards their recurved lines of great beauty…slighter foliage allows the branches freer play…”4 The further descriptions given of the way that both the flower buds and the leaf buds unfold, gives a detailed and methodical dance in which they arrange themselves, avoiding each others’ space and light source. The section on the sex life of trees is lengthy. “The Ash is a good example: one individual tree…only male flowers, another individual…only female flowers…a third…both bisexual and unisexual flowers…the same branch on an ash may produce different types of flowers in different years.”5 Are trees more complicated life-forms than humans? Perhaps their lack of speech prevents deception.

1“Celtic Tree Mysteries” p.98 Blamires, Steve

2op. cit. p.99

3“The Artistic Anatomy of Trees” pp.107, 108 Cole, Rex Vicat

4op. cit. p. 158

5op. cit. p. 271

[references]

 

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